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PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 8:01 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
June 23, 2006— Just being in the same room as peanuts can send Liam Park into a violent allergy attack. And yet, the 4-year-old from Charlotte, N.C., intentionally eats peanut flour every day.

Liam is part of a potentially groundbreaking study at Duke Medical Center aimed at finding out whether children with peanut allergies can be desensitized to peanuts and eventually cured of their ailment altogether.

"Our goals in treatment are the desensitization, to make them less sensitive and also to make their peanut allergy go away," said Dr. Wesley Burks, chief of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology at Duke Medical Center.

Full story at http://www.abcnews.go.com/GMA/OnCall/st ... 158&page=1

Video: http://www.abcnews.go.com/Video/playerIndex?id=2110645

IMPORTANT NOTE: Burks stresses that parents should not try this at home on their own. In his study, the peanut flour is administered under tight medical supervision, and patients are observed for hours afterwards.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 8:38 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:09 am
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Quote:
He predicts there will be a viable treatment for peanut allergies within five years.

Wow that's really encouraging!


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 1:17 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:05 pm
Posts: 528
Location: Burlington, Ontario
How wonderfully encouraging is that!!!

:D

Thank you for posting this article, Karen, I added it to my "Peanu allergyt" file.

_________________
15 year old - asthmatic, allergic to cats, dogs, horses, waiting to be "officially" diagnosed for anaphylaxis
12 year old - asthmatic, allergic to tree pollen and mold, OAS
Husband - Allergic to amoxycillin
Self - Allergic to housework only


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 2:34 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 19, 2006 11:58 pm
Posts: 275
Location: on my pc in cp
that's very interesting.. and very encouraging with any luck everything goes as planned

along this line i have a question for you parents. i had a little girl come up to my canteen stand a while ago, and our brownies have nuts in them, and as always i ask "is it an allergy" and she goes no not anymore! and i look and wait for the mother and she's like oh yeah she used to have a peanut allergy, but she's fine now and we just pick out the nuts cause she never developed a taste for them...

now the question... if your child's allergy suddenly reversed itself (i know that other allergies can i assume that food ones can too) would you feel comfortable allowing them to have products which have the former allergen in it?


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 6:35 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
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Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Good question.

My kids have outgrown a few of their allergies and it does take time to get used to the idea of them eating the food. You're always looking for a reaction at the start and checking every little runny nose and sneeze. My youngest outgrew both wheat and barley after 3+ years, for example. He eats all kinds of things with wheat and barley in them now, and it seems normal. But it did take some time.

But these haven't been his severe allergies. My oldest is a candidate for an oral food challenge for peanuts, based on his skin/blood test results, but he doesn't want to do it yet (which we are respecting). If he ever does 'outgrow' peanuts, that will really take some adjusting to. Two separate friends of mine whose kids have outgrown peanuts have been told to have their child continue to wear the EpiPen for at least a year to make sure that there isn't another reaction. It's not always definitive that the allergy has been outgrown, obviously.

One of these friends has found that it's near impossible to get her child to eat peanuts, while the other has had no problem. I would probably continue to watch really carefully and carry the EpiPen for a good long while. Would I ever be comfortable watching my kids eat peanuts or nuts or dairy if they outgrow it? I really don't know... I guess I would get used to it. Eventually.

But I do know that people have outgrown even very severe allergies, so I guess you have to have some faith at some point.

How about the rest of you? Anyone outgrown a severe allergy - or had a child outgrow it? How does it feel to watch them eat it?

K.

P.S. Sorry about the long answer. I guess I just can't help myself. :lol:

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 6:48 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
I've never outgrown an allergy....but if, say, my allergies magically disappeared tomorrow, I would be fine with eating soy, egg. and all the rest...except for peanuts or tree nuts which I have a strong aversion too.. Wait...actually, I'd probably avoid soy milk too....although I'd be willing to eat any type of soy that didn't have the soy milk taste (which to me is pretty revolting).

This study is really interesting. I have to say that I'm tempted to try it at home with things that I'm not severely severely allergic to. I'd mention it to my allergist first, however...I'd like to know whether the researchers think this will only work on children whose immune systems are still developing? or whether there is hope for allergic adults too.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 8:30 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
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Location: Toronto
First, I'd heard about Dr. Burks' study and find those parents incredibly brave.

Karen, I have a friend who outgrew a tree nut allergy - she was at risk of anaphylaxis and had experienced a couple of pretty bad reactions. She is supposed eat nuts to keep up the sensitization, but doesn't do it nearly as often as she should.

My friend still has her husband, the phone and her Epi at the ready when she does eat a few nuts. She knows this is mostly psychological but does find it hard to get past the fear. Still, while she doesn't exactly "enjoy" those nuts, she is getting a little more relaxed eating them while in her state of emerg. readiness. I don't ever expect to see her eating nuts or nut garnished food in public.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 10:46 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
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Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Thanks Gwen. I imagine that's how a lot of people would feel if they'd experienced a severe reaction - let alone several. And I agree that those parents -- and children -- are very brave.

A picture of Dr. Burks can be found at

http://news.mc.duke.edu/av/medminute.php?id=8535

along with some details, including this:

Quote:
"If we can find a safe and effective way to do it, there's nothing specific about the peanut that we couldn't do it with other foods like milk, eggs and tree nuts."


Very interesting....

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 27, 2006 2:34 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Here's another article about this study, titled "Study: Kids' bodies trained to tolerate allergies" from Associated Press.

http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/12/26/ki ... index.html

It's quite a good summary of what's going on, I thought.

Part of the article:

Quote:
Don't try this experiment on your own, warns lead researcher Dr. A. Wesley Burks of Duke University Medical Center. Children in the study are closely monitored for the real risk of life-threatening reactions.

But if the work pans out -- and larger studies are beginning -- it would be a major advance in the quest to at least reduce severe food allergies that trigger 30,000 emergency-room visits and kill 150 people a year [in the U.S.].

"I really think in five years there's going to be a treatment available for kids with food allergy," says Burks.


K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2007 12:01 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2006 10:59 am
Posts: 63
Location: Ohio
Hi Everyone

We are seriously considering doing the study. I called Dr. Burks and he said he would be willing to enroll my son. I am trying to get a face to face meeting with him right now to discuss the advantages and disadvantages. My son is still very young so I don't want to subject him to something that he may not tolerate well at his age. I asked Dr. Burks if age matters (that this trial would work better if your younger than older) his response was that this is one of his hypotheses (younger = better outcome) but he has no data at this point to back it up. Plus how do you quantify younger? Under 10 or under 5, etc?

If after talking to him we find out his success rates are low (say 2 or 3 out of 10) we probably won't do it. But if they are high (7+ out of 10) we will probably go with it.

I will keep everyone up to date on what I find out and what our decision might be.....

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2.5 year old: allergic to wheat, dairy, egg, peanut, oat, turkey, and cats
5 year old: no known allergies
Husband no known allergies
Me allergy to morphine only


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2007 5:10 pm 
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Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Wow - definitely keep us in the loop. And thanks for considering taking part, on behalf of all us with allergies and/or allergic kids.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 10:34 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 10:24 pm
Posts: 13
There's a cool series of posts on the Peanutallergy.com message boards, from one of the moms in this trial. It's pretty scary in the beginning.

Link to:
http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutal ... 00187.html

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My family's website, with stories of my allergic kids: http://mykidsallergies.blogspot.com


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 1:42 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2006 10:59 am
Posts: 63
Location: Ohio
Thank you so much for that link! I am even more excited about the possiblity now that I have read that.

_________________
2.5 year old: allergic to wheat, dairy, egg, peanut, oat, turkey, and cats
5 year old: no known allergies
Husband no known allergies
Me allergy to morphine only


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 3:04 pm 
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Posts: 1054
I'm so excited about this research! :D


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 10:03 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 933
Location: Oakville, Ontario
I'm also feeling excited about this research (cautiously excited). Thank you for sending along the link to the the peanutallergy.com message board - it was really something to read Melissa's story. When we see our son's allergist next month (Dr. Waserman - past president of AAIA, and one of the allergists with Allergic Living's "Ask the Allergist" section), I would like to talk to her about how she feels about this clinical trial. Dare we begin to hope for a cure? ... or at least begin to hope for reducing the risk of living with life-threatening food allergies.

_________________
15 yr old daughter: no health issues
12 yr old son: allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, fish, sesame, sunflower, mustard, poppy seeds, peas, carrots, some fruits, instructed to avoid all other legumes (except soy & green beans), pollen, cats, horses


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